owe-you-so-much:

the most unrealistic thing about young adult novels is that none of the teenagers swear

supernatasha:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

Imagine stabbing someone with this knife. 

It would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

the person in the gif actually using it to make instant toast is a hufflepuff.

(Source: picapixels)

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

teenmum:

what staff really needs to do is delete those blogs who havent updated since 2009 with cool one word url’s

(Source: girlpal)

nue:

i hate teachers who give homework over break like do u not understand what a break is do u want me to demonstrate on ur neck

unnaturalhorsemanship:

horses-are-love:

shinsengumi14:

theawkwardblack3questrian:

thepretentiouspony:

“I have a dream that one day a black child will ride for South Africa in the Olympics,” said Enos Mafokate, founder of the Soweto Equestrian Foundation, who came to London for World Horse Welfare’s recent annual conference. 
During his presentation, Enos spoke about the immense opportunity equestrian sport can provide for young people, recounting his experiences as an aspiring equestrian competitor - an unheard of ambition in South Africa during apartheid.
From groom to Games
Enos’ story is particularly inspirational. He was born in 1946 in a Johannesburg township. Discovering his passion for horses in the late 1950s, Enos overcame racial barriers in equestrian sport and began competing in show jumping in 1962.
Recognised by David Broome for his natural horse riding abilities in 1980, Enos went on to complete in the working hunter class at the Royal International Horse Show at Wembley, making him the first black rider to represent South Africa in Europe. In 1992, he attended the Olympic Games as part of a development team in Barcelona, Spain, and later he captained the winning South African team at the All Nations Cup in Swaziland.
Helping the community
Despite his competitive successes, Enos always remained true to his heart. At the peak of his international career in 1990, Enos began giving free riding lessons to children from his local community.
Enos completed World Horse Welfare’s farriery training course in Cape Town, where he gained professional shoeing skills, and continued to work as a competent farrier. In 2007, and in partnership with Johannesburg City Council and World Horse Welfare, Enos founded a not-for-profit organisation, The Soweto Equestrian Foundation (SEF), in the heart of Soweto.
The SEF is now an affiliate of World Horse Welfare, which has supported various aspects of its development including helping to fund the construction of the further stabling and student accommodation. Having built excellent training facilities within the equestrian centre, Enos has truly been able to encourage participation in equestrian sport and promote the welfare of working horses through hosting World Horse Welfare’s farriery and harness-making courses.
Realising the dream
The Soweto Equestrian Foundation aims to open the elite world of equestrian sports to people who would never otherwise have the chance. Over 700 children from the local community, care homes and orphanages have been introduced to horses and horse riding at centre.
Every week disabled children from Adelaide Tambo School in Soweto enjoy the benefits of riding a horse – which acts as occupational and physiotherapy and increases their confidence.
Enos also encourages children with the desire to reach the top level of equestrian sport to compete at national and international levels. So much so that in 2010, the SEF Vaulting Team won a number of classes at the South African Vaulting Championships, with one of the team members subsequently being selected to represent South Africa at the World Equestrian Games in Kentucky.
An inspiration
“World Horse Welfare is so proud to be working with Enos and the Soweto Equestrian Foundation to improve the lives of working horses and raise the profile of horses in the country,” said World Horse Welfare chief executive Roly Owers. “It has been a delight to host him this week on his visit to London. We were all deeply inspired at the conference by Enos’ passion and commitment to realising his dream, and were delighted that we were able to help him share this dream with others.
“At World Horse Welfare we are concerned with the wellbeing of all horses, from the highest level Olympic eventing horse to the working horses that toil day by day in the developing world, in places such as Soweto. Enos’ story shows the connection between these two horse worlds, and the opportunity that equestrianism can provide for young people.
World Horse Welfare Trustee Pippa Funnell added: “I thought Enos’ presentation was one of the most moving and inspirational that I had ever heard. The world of equestrian sport needs more people like Enos who persevere through adversity and still find time to bring the sport to the younger generation.”


this is awesome!!!

Beautiful


Wow. I think I have a new hero. unnaturalhorsemanship:

horses-are-love:

shinsengumi14:

theawkwardblack3questrian:

thepretentiouspony:

“I have a dream that one day a black child will ride for South Africa in the Olympics,” said Enos Mafokate, founder of the Soweto Equestrian Foundation, who came to London for World Horse Welfare’s recent annual conference. 
During his presentation, Enos spoke about the immense opportunity equestrian sport can provide for young people, recounting his experiences as an aspiring equestrian competitor - an unheard of ambition in South Africa during apartheid.
From groom to Games
Enos’ story is particularly inspirational. He was born in 1946 in a Johannesburg township. Discovering his passion for horses in the late 1950s, Enos overcame racial barriers in equestrian sport and began competing in show jumping in 1962.
Recognised by David Broome for his natural horse riding abilities in 1980, Enos went on to complete in the working hunter class at the Royal International Horse Show at Wembley, making him the first black rider to represent South Africa in Europe. In 1992, he attended the Olympic Games as part of a development team in Barcelona, Spain, and later he captained the winning South African team at the All Nations Cup in Swaziland.
Helping the community
Despite his competitive successes, Enos always remained true to his heart. At the peak of his international career in 1990, Enos began giving free riding lessons to children from his local community.
Enos completed World Horse Welfare’s farriery training course in Cape Town, where he gained professional shoeing skills, and continued to work as a competent farrier. In 2007, and in partnership with Johannesburg City Council and World Horse Welfare, Enos founded a not-for-profit organisation, The Soweto Equestrian Foundation (SEF), in the heart of Soweto.
The SEF is now an affiliate of World Horse Welfare, which has supported various aspects of its development including helping to fund the construction of the further stabling and student accommodation. Having built excellent training facilities within the equestrian centre, Enos has truly been able to encourage participation in equestrian sport and promote the welfare of working horses through hosting World Horse Welfare’s farriery and harness-making courses.
Realising the dream
The Soweto Equestrian Foundation aims to open the elite world of equestrian sports to people who would never otherwise have the chance. Over 700 children from the local community, care homes and orphanages have been introduced to horses and horse riding at centre.
Every week disabled children from Adelaide Tambo School in Soweto enjoy the benefits of riding a horse – which acts as occupational and physiotherapy and increases their confidence.
Enos also encourages children with the desire to reach the top level of equestrian sport to compete at national and international levels. So much so that in 2010, the SEF Vaulting Team won a number of classes at the South African Vaulting Championships, with one of the team members subsequently being selected to represent South Africa at the World Equestrian Games in Kentucky.
An inspiration
“World Horse Welfare is so proud to be working with Enos and the Soweto Equestrian Foundation to improve the lives of working horses and raise the profile of horses in the country,” said World Horse Welfare chief executive Roly Owers. “It has been a delight to host him this week on his visit to London. We were all deeply inspired at the conference by Enos’ passion and commitment to realising his dream, and were delighted that we were able to help him share this dream with others.
“At World Horse Welfare we are concerned with the wellbeing of all horses, from the highest level Olympic eventing horse to the working horses that toil day by day in the developing world, in places such as Soweto. Enos’ story shows the connection between these two horse worlds, and the opportunity that equestrianism can provide for young people.
World Horse Welfare Trustee Pippa Funnell added: “I thought Enos’ presentation was one of the most moving and inspirational that I had ever heard. The world of equestrian sport needs more people like Enos who persevere through adversity and still find time to bring the sport to the younger generation.”


this is awesome!!!

Beautiful


Wow. I think I have a new hero.

unnaturalhorsemanship:

horses-are-love:

shinsengumi14:

theawkwardblack3questrian:

thepretentiouspony:

“I have a dream that one day a black child will ride for South Africa in the Olympics,” said Enos Mafokate, founder of the Soweto Equestrian Foundation, who came to London for World Horse Welfare’s recent annual conference.

During his presentation, Enos spoke about the immense opportunity equestrian sport can provide for young people, recounting his experiences as an aspiring equestrian competitor - an unheard of ambition in South Africa during apartheid.

From groom to Games

Enos’ story is particularly inspirational. He was born in 1946 in a Johannesburg township. Discovering his passion for horses in the late 1950s, Enos overcame racial barriers in equestrian sport and began competing in show jumping in 1962.

Recognised by David Broome for his natural horse riding abilities in 1980, Enos went on to complete in the working hunter class at the Royal International Horse Show at Wembley, making him the first black rider to represent South Africa in Europe. In 1992, he attended the Olympic Games as part of a development team in Barcelona, Spain, and later he captained the winning South African team at the All Nations Cup in Swaziland.

Helping the community

Despite his competitive successes, Enos always remained true to his heart. At the peak of his international career in 1990, Enos began giving free riding lessons to children from his local community.

Enos completed World Horse Welfare’s farriery training course in Cape Town, where he gained professional shoeing skills, and continued to work as a competent farrier. In 2007, and in partnership with Johannesburg City Council and World Horse Welfare, Enos founded a not-for-profit organisation, The Soweto Equestrian Foundation (SEF), in the heart of Soweto.

The SEF is now an affiliate of World Horse Welfare, which has supported various aspects of its development including helping to fund the construction of the further stabling and student accommodation. Having built excellent training facilities within the equestrian centre, Enos has truly been able to encourage participation in equestrian sport and promote the welfare of working horses through hosting World Horse Welfare’s farriery and harness-making courses.

Realising the dream

The Soweto Equestrian Foundation aims to open the elite world of equestrian sports to people who would never otherwise have the chance. Over 700 children from the local community, care homes and orphanages have been introduced to horses and horse riding at centre.

Every week disabled children from Adelaide Tambo School in Soweto enjoy the benefits of riding a horse – which acts as occupational and physiotherapy and increases their confidence.

Enos also encourages children with the desire to reach the top level of equestrian sport to compete at national and international levels. So much so that in 2010, the SEF Vaulting Team won a number of classes at the South African Vaulting Championships, with one of the team members subsequently being selected to represent South Africa at the World Equestrian Games in Kentucky.

An inspiration

“World Horse Welfare is so proud to be working with Enos and the Soweto Equestrian Foundation to improve the lives of working horses and raise the profile of horses in the country,” said World Horse Welfare chief executive Roly Owers. “It has been a delight to host him this week on his visit to London. We were all deeply inspired at the conference by Enos’ passion and commitment to realising his dream, and were delighted that we were able to help him share this dream with others.

“At World Horse Welfare we are concerned with the wellbeing of all horses, from the highest level Olympic eventing horse to the working horses that toil day by day in the developing world, in places such as Soweto. Enos’ story shows the connection between these two horse worlds, and the opportunity that equestrianism can provide for young people.

World Horse Welfare Trustee Pippa Funnell added: “I thought Enos’ presentation was one of the most moving and inspirational that I had ever heard. The world of equestrian sport needs more people like Enos who persevere through adversity and still find time to bring the sport to the younger generation.”

this is awesome!!!

Beautiful

Wow. I think I have a new hero.

durnesque-esque:

thenotoriousscuttlecliff:

the-timelord-girl-who-hunts:

wordsofdiana:

The only thing I want in Avengers 2 is Cap picking up Thor’s hammer, totally unaware it should be impossible.

Actually in Marvel lore it is implicitly stated That Steve is one of only a few people on earth actually worthy of carrying Thor’s hammer

To hell with Steve, I want Natasha to pick it up and realise, even with all the red in her ledger, she is still just as worthy as Thor or Steve. 

dutchster:

it took me a while to figure out what was wrong

fishmostly:

Source: Szécsei Tibor “Forest Lair”
Check out his flickr or this thread to view the full development of the tank.

(Source: vlatkon)

texasuberalles:

livingwithdisability:

How to remove a ring from a swollen finger without cutting it off.

This is amazingly clever, and absolutely needs to be propagated among healthcare professionals; it won’t be useful often, but when it is, it could seriously save lives, because people hold up their own emergency treatment for sentimental and emotional reasons every day in every ER in the world.

My wedding ring was my father’s ring for 32 years of loving marriage before my mother died, and I would not hesitate to tell an EMT to take the finger off and reattach it later if they could before I would let them cut this ring.